Stuff I like.

tastefullyoffensive:

Animals Using Other Animals as Pillows [boredpanda]

Previously: Animals Wearing Dinosaur Costumes

Queen - Another One Bites The Dust
1,813 plays

radtracks:

another one bites the dust // queen

how do you think i’m gonna get along
without you, when you’re gone?
you took me for everything that i had
and kicked me out on my own

theraptorcage:

Northern Hawk Owl

sergendry:

chippper:

for-redheads:

Ginger Animal of the Week

Caracal / Desert Lynx (Caracal caracal)

Photos  |   [1] Caracal by Sandra Metzbauer  |  [2] by Annafur  |  [3]  Tiny little kitten by Andreas Jansrud

screeches

The progression here is amazing

  1. MAJESTIC
  2. MAJESTIC
  3. TINY POOFY CUPCAKE

vintagegal:

Happy Birthday Stephen King! (September 21, 1947) 

"People want to know why I do this, why I write such gross stuff. I like to tell them I have the heart of a small boy… and I keep it in a jar on my desk."

prettylilkinkdoll:

daddy—wolfie:

thelittlelostkitten:

sixpenceee:

Creepy sculptures you can find at Victoria’s Way, a park at Ireland.

More information

 I want to go

been there

polyamorouslife:

In early times, the darkly glorious yew-tree was probably the only evergreen tree in Britain. Both Druids with their belief in reincarnation, and later Christians with their teaching of the resurrection, regarded it as a natural emblem of everlasting life. Its capacity for great age enriched its symbolic value. The early Irish regarded it as one of the most ancient beings on earth. Yew is the last on a list of oldest things in a passage from the fourteenth century Book of Lismore: ‘Three lifetimes of the yew for the world from its beginning to its end.’
The yew’s reputation for long life is due to the unique way in which the tree grows. Its branches grow down into the ground to form new stems, which then rise up around the old central growth as separate but linked trunks. After a time, they cannot be distinguished from the original tree. So the yew has always been a symbol of death and rebirth, the new that springs out of the old, and a fitting tree for us to study at the beginning of the new year.

polyamorouslife:

In early times, the darkly glorious yew-tree was probably the only evergreen tree in Britain. Both Druids with their belief in reincarnation, and later Christians with their teaching of the resurrection, regarded it as a natural emblem of everlasting life. Its capacity for great age enriched its symbolic value. The early Irish regarded it as one of the most ancient beings on earth. Yew is the last on a list of oldest things in a passage from the fourteenth century Book of Lismore: ‘Three lifetimes of the yew for the world from its beginning to its end.’

The yew’s reputation for long life is due to the unique way in which the tree grows. Its branches grow down into the ground to form new stems, which then rise up around the old central growth as separate but linked trunks. After a time, they cannot be distinguished from the original tree. So the yew has always been a symbol of death and rebirth, the new that springs out of the old, and a fitting tree for us to study at the beginning of the new year.

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Playing by Stefan Rosengarten)